Time for Balance

As the summer months approach in the Northern Hemisphere, many calendars already are full with graduations, weddings, parties, barbecues, concerts, and/or vacations.  In the midst of this, many of us still have our usual work to do, grocery shopping, house cleaning, medical appointments, and other myriad tasks of daily life.

Sometimes, we get overwhelmed.  So much to do, so little time.  At some point, we may find ourselves staring out a window, watching the sky.  Or sitting in traffic, yet again.  Or shuffling the same pile of papers for the fifth time.  We may notice that we feel discontented, frustrated, or stifled.  We’re aware that something isn’t working and that “something’s gotta give,” though we aren’t sure what.  In the rush, rush, rush, we forget that we’re human beings, not human “doings.”

What we seek, no matter what we call it, is a deeper connection with God / Spirit / Our Higher Power — and a greater sense of balance.  Our awareness of this desire brings us to a new level of spiritual maturity, the place where we discover that finding our own inner balance is the key to personal growth and contentment.

To gain greater balance and deepen your spiritual practice, consider these suggestions:

  • Set — and keep — a schedule for daily contemplation, meditation, prayer, and reflection. Remember: God first; then everything else.  If we think we’re too busy for this step, it’s a warning that we’re already imbalanced.  Let’s remind ourselves that spiritual masters begin and end their days with this practice.
  • Set — and keep — a schedule which includes daily, weekly, monthly, and annual self-care for our bodies, homes, and vehicles so we and all our “stuff” are tip-top. Remember: Let’s not be so busy driving that we run out of gas.  Valuing ourselves first actually supports us in serving others better.
  • Integrate times for rest, nourishment, play, and work. Remember: God doesn’t give gold stars for overdoing, sacrificing, or struggling.  We just burn out, become resentful, and often hurt ourselves.
  • Notice and acknowledge both our feelings when we say “Yes” to something and “No” to something. As Jesus advises in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:37), “Let your ‘Yes,’ be ‘Yes,’ and let your ‘No,’ be ‘No.’” Remember: If we waffle, and believe that we “should” do something that isn’t ours to do or that we can’t do, we devalue ourselves and others involved.
  • Discern how we share ourselves on social media, and whom or what we follow. Let us notice whether our feeds uplift and support our lives, or whether we feel “bad” about ourselves and our accomplishments.  Remember: We each have divine gifts which bless this world.  As we focus on ours first, we appreciate ourselves and feel content with who we are now.

Overall, remember: Our lives are divine journeys of learning and growth.  No matter where we are, however we are, we are God’s Beloved, Divine Creations, and God is with us, within us, in the midst of every part of the journey.

© 2018 – Rev. Jennifer L. Sacks.  All rights reserved.