Relieved to Let Go

As we travel our own faithful journeys, many of us notice that some things and people don’t change, no matter how much we wish they would.  And many of us have fought, labored, and struggled to change or fix something or someone unready for change.

It’s like trying to kill a mosquito — pick your figurative one — with a machete.  In the process, we usually succeed at loping off a proverbial finger, hand, or arm.  And as we sit in the emergency room of life, awaiting treatment, we’re scratching the mosquito bite we got anyway.

This is an exercise in futility, an ineffectual and unfulfilling attempt to find comfort, peace, and especially, relief.  When we get caught in cycles of futility, we falsely believe that if we try it one more time, it — whatever “it” is — will change.  We may justify our actions by asserting these anthems of futility: “But . . . we’ve always done it this way” or “But . . . I always go this way” or “But . . . this is the only way that will work” or “But . . . they won’t like it.”

In the process, we keep ourselves stuck by what we believe and what we say, so we never experience the relief we truly desire, like the Greek myth of Sisyphus, forever trying to push a boulder up a mountain.

If we’re ready to find the relief and peace of mind we seek, let us consider whether we’re also ready to let these go:

  • Acquiring more and more possessions, always expecting the next thing to make us happy.
  • Needing everything to be perfect.
  • Needing everyone to like us and/or agree with us.
  • Needing to be “right.”
  • Arguing with someone who doesn’t value respect and mutuality, and doesn’t want to listen.
  • Lashing out to diminish others so we feel better about ourselves.
  • Rehashing the past, either blaming ourselves or others for outcomes which didn’t work.
  • Worrying about the future and trying to prepare for every imaginable outcome.
  • Gunny-sacking and holding onto to old upsets and grievances.
  • Thinking that loving and liking are synonymous.
  • Believing that we can mature spiritually when we’re emotionally unhealthy.
  • Demanding certainty in a world which can be uncertain.
  • Trying to steer the Universe while we tell God how it’s “supposed” to be.

Each of these blocks our spiritual growth and hinders the ease, comfort, love, peace, and ultimate relief so many of us seek.

Yet, at any moment, no matter where we are on our journey, we can change our minds, alter our beliefs, and act differently.  No matter what has been true for us before, we can choose to let go and let God.  And with trust and faith, we’re relieved to discover how many new paths await us on our way.

© 2018 – Rev. Jennifer L. Sacks.  All rights reserved.

Be A Light

One of our discoveries on this life journey is that we have divine gifts and talents to share.  Whatever these are, they’re the light of God, expressing through us, shining as us.

Jesus taught in the “Sermon on the Mount”:

You are the light of the world.  A city set on a hill cannot be hidden; nor does anyone light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on the lampstand, so it gives light to all who are in the house.  Let your light shine before others in such a way that they may see your good works, and glorify God . . . . (Matthew 5:14-16)

As Jesus, and all great spiritual masters teach, our light allows us to be a Presence and Expression of God in the world.  If you’re ready to discover, develop, and shine the light of God you are, follow these suggestions:

  • Cherish your contemplation, meditation, prayer, and reflection time.  This is our opportunity to connect with God, re-charge our batteries, and take stock of what works or doesn’t work in our lives.
  • Remember that we shine brightest when we manage our energy, rather than our time.  The most energizing activities and work we do is often fun for us, even if the tasks involved aren’t always simple or easy.
  • Consider “To-Do Lists” and “Wish Lists.”  Notice your passions and what energizes you, as well as what depletes and diminishes you.  If it has a “should” or heavy sense of obligation around it, it usually dims our light.
  • Find one thing you can do to shine your light for others.  This can be anything from attending a rally in support of a cause; delivering meals to shut-ins; driving a loved one to the market or an appointment; helping build a house; shipping books overseas so others can learn to read.  Whatever you choose, do it with verve, passion, and joy.
  • Support others who’re trying to find their own light, too, especially children learning new skills or retirees rediscovering former joys.
  • Avoid those who attempt to block or cover your light. Bless them and release them with love, reminding yourself, if necessary, that if they don’t like your light, they can wear sunglasses.
  • Know that sometimes the best we can do is witness another’s journey. We can’t make them see a light if they aren’t ready to remove their blinders.
  • Have a spiritual support network which includes prayer partners, and trusted clergy, coaches, counsellors, and/or friends who encourage and nurture your continued growth and learning.
  • Within your spiritual community, plug into a team or group which enlivens you and reminds all team members of their light, strength, and wisdom to serve.
  • If you aren’t yet connected to a spiritual community, find one which honors diversity and affirms the Presence of God, the Divine Light, in all people.
  • Overall, remember that however we’re called to be a light on the way, we faithfully and compassionately pave a way for others too.

© 2018 – Rev. Jennifer L. Sacks.  All rights reserved.